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School Visit to Ngomongo Village

When we went to Kenya in February 2007, we decided that we wanted to organise an outing for the whole school.

First we consulted the teachers as to where would be a good place to go. They seemed to be unanimous on their choice of Ngomongo Village. Second we consulted our driver Chals on the practicality and cost of transport for everyone. Prices ranged from 20,000ks to 7,000ks, so we plumped for the latter.

On the Friday when we were due to go, Chals turned up at our hotel in a very beaten up matatu. (Battered mini bus, the favoured mode of public transport for the masses.) The children were very excited and clamoured to be on the first run. It took three trips to get everybody there. Every journey never quiet, the children singing loud every inch of the way. (Ear defenders recommended for all future trips!)

Fortunately, there was a children's playground with a roundabout, swings seesaw and climbing frame, so the first two groups had plenty of fun whilst waiting for everyone to be assembled. (The provision of similar apparatus at the school would be a big bonus for the children.)

Before we set off with our guides, we gave all the children a banana and water to keep them going. (Flagging children were topped up with additional "banana fuel" as and when identified.) The party was put into two groups with a guide for each.

The tour took us through a forest and in each clearing was a village setting typical of a tribe from a particular part of Kenya. At each stop, there was someone dressed in appropriate costume to show the children the sleeping quarters, cooking area etc. There were demonstrations of maize grinding, archery, tool making and so on.

 

The children were able to experience many of the activities for themselves. They also saw ostriches and crocodiles as well as many birds, trees and plants. A sudden movement by a crocodile increased rapidly the distance between the waters edge and most of the group, There was a demonstration of African dancing, after which we were invited to join in. Why did they find our efforts so amusing?

Additional "fuel", in the form of biscuits and water, was dispensed before the journey back. Our driver did a wonderful job, the teachers were so good looking after the group and, most of all the children seemed to enjoy themselves. We found it extremely worthwhile.